The Two Peasants

Kriloff’s Original Fables
” The morning to thee, Matthew i “—” Ah, gossip George,
good-day !

—”How wags the world with thee, my friend?” —” Ah, gossip, in a mess to which no end
!
Guests came, we had a snack : my house I set on fire, And I’ve since got to beg, or else go out on hire.” —” How that? No joke ‘twould be !

—”Just so ! At Christmas we’d a feast you see :
I with a candle went to give the horses hay
:
Frankly my head went round a little
;
I somehow dropped the light, and somehow got away
Myself, but house and goods burned, every tittle. Bah! how’st with thee?”—”I, Matthew, I am
worse
:
Upon me for my sins a curse
;
Not ev’n a leg, On which to beg ; How I am still alive’s a wonder
!
I too at Christmas, to the cellar under
The stairs, for beer went, and—shall I confess ?

Had got my head warmed, as thou well mayst
guess ;
Bottles ‘mong friends get empty fast
:
Fearing a fire, should I down the candle cast,
I took and blew it out
:
But on the stairs the devil himself gave such a
clout,
That I got up but half a man,
And since on crutches limp as best I can.”
” The blame on you, my friends, is even.”
Said, overhearing, neighbour Stephen : ” To say the truth, if I don’t blunder,
‘Tis no great wonder,
That thou thy house hast burned, and thou hast got
Crutches for life : when drunk, a light’s a snare, We go with it to pot
;
But, drunk in darkness, may we not Have greater ills to bear.”