The Old Hen and the Cock

Moral: No Moral. Suggest us a moral of this fable in comment section.
Once an old hen led forth her brood
To scratch and glean and peck for food;
A chick, to give her wings a spell,
Fluttered and tumbled in a well.
The mother wept till day was done,
When she met with a grown−up son,
And thus addressed him:—“My dear boy,
Your years and vigour give me joy:
You thrash all cocks around, I’m told;
‘Tis right, cocks should be brave and bold:
But never—fears I cannot quell—
Never, my son, go near that well;
A hateful, false, and wretched place,
Which is most fatal to my race.
Imprint that counsel on your breast,
And trust to providence the rest.”
He thanked the dame’s maternal care,
And promised never to go near.
Yet still he burned to disobey,
And hovered round it day by day;
And communed thus: “I wonder why?
Does mother think my soul is shy?
Thinks me a coward? or does she
Store grain in yonder well from me?
I’ll find that out, and so here goes.”
So said, he flaps his wings and crows,
Mounted the margin, peered below,
Where to repel him rose a foe.
His choler rose, his plumes upreared—
With ruffled plumes the foe appeared.
Challenged to fight—he dashed him down
Upon the mirrored wave to drown;
And drowning uttered: “This condition
Comes from my mother’s prohibition.
Did she forget, or not believe,
That I too am a son of Eve?”